Making each day a little sweeter

The Mormon feminist protest: And why I won’t be there.

When I was a little girl, I knew I’d be a working girl. I walked around in my mom’s high heels, my tiny feet barely filling the toes of them, a huge purse dangling from my shoulder. I’d pretend to go to the office, writing stories that I’d staple together, all the while holding a baby doll under my arm. Sometimes three baby dolls.

I had it right all along on how a woman works. Some women choose to stay home and have a family. Some women choose to have a career and devote all her time to her work desk. And then there’s crazy chicks like me, who want to do EVERYTHING under the sun. *insanity*

Everything except hold the priesthood. No thanks.

And I’ll tell you why. I’m a woman. And that is NOT meant to come across as a sexist remark. That little girl I was telling you about grew up and did the same thing she’s always wanted to do (minus the fact that my husband and I are trying for children, but aren’t yet blessed with them :)). I’m working a full time job in a busy news industry, keeping up a home, blogging, writing novels, serving as a primary teacher, and praying that at some point in the day I still have time to eat and maybe, just maybe, paint my nails. I know a lot of you are nodding your heads about right now. Especially the Mamas. Whether you work a job outside the home or not, if you’re a mom, you have it MUCH more challenging than the rest of us. Props to you.

momandbaby

Being a woman comes with SO many responsibilities, and blessings no matter what religion you are or ethnicity. So when I heard that a group of feminists are planning to protest outside the LDS church’s General Conference center during General Conference because they want to be ordained with the priesthood, I became infuriated. Yes. Even a workaholic, women-are-equal, I-want-to-climb-the-ladder-of-success girl like me.

And it doesn’t just have to do with my religious reasons, although I’ll share those first. The priesthood is something we can all exercise. I use the priesthood all the time when I ask my husband for a blessing or I have faith in ordinations enough to fulfill tough callings. I use the priesthood when I attend the temple and when I read my patriarchal blessing and see things coming to pass. I use it all the time because it’s intended for me to use. Heavenly Father thinks I have great worth, and intended the priesthood to be used so that I can benefit from it.

But as a woman, it’s not my gender role to be given the priesthood in the same way that a man is. It’s not sexist. It’s not a superiority complex. It’s just the difference between responsibilities that Heavenly Father wants us to have, no matter who we are or where in the world we live. Because Heaven knows that the Lord has given us many responsibilities that men don’t get to have. I won’t even try to count all of those. *my head would hurt*

nursewoman

But like I mentioned, my biggest beef isn’t even religious reasons. It’s the fact that in today’s world, Mormon or not, whether you be Catholic or Atheist or Protestant–whether you be liberal or conservative– parts of the women’s rights movement is moving past the “equal” mark and taking it to the “We’re even better than men” mark. And furthermore, some even go as far as not wanting to even be considered a woman. A child was born some time ago (and I heard it through the news) and the parents of that child refused to disclose its gender. That makes me sad. Because for some reason the world tells us that being a certain gender will block off opportunities or back us into a corner. But that couldn’t be more of a lie. Your gender is a blessing, and a huge framework to who you are.

Being a woman is a blessing. It is a gender that is inherently gentle and nurturing. It is a gender that gives you the power to bear a child or be a mother figure for a child. It is the gender that empowers you to step into a workplace with a unique, and sometimes more analytical or creative perspective. It is the gender that has changed the world, just as the male gender has. So why be ashamed of it to the point where we don’t want to be unique–we just strive to be the very same?

Femininity is something to be proud of, and I am proud to say that my Heavenly Father has endowed me with gifts that my husband doesn’t have, and has endowed my husband with gifts that I don’t have. But all those gifts benefit both of us. It’s an eternal principle that cannot be changed, even as the world changes. Even as extreme views pronounce that gender means nothing anymore because we’re all the sameBut we’re not. We’re very different, and that’s what keeps humanity moving forward.

student

God’s law doesn’t change just because the world’s opinion does.

When it comes to women in the workplace, even in managerial and leadership positions–I’m on the front lines. When it comes to women voting, and having a say in every single part of government–I’m on the front lines. When it comes to women being treated with respect and dignity and equal opportunity to reach dreams and goals–I’m right there on the front lines.

But when it comes to the world professing that gender isn’t a factor anymore, even if it means changing doctrine or naming baby girls gender-neutral names all for the sake of “making her equal to men”–I take a step back.

Because I’m a woman. And I’m proud of that. You should be too.

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1,761 Responses to “The Mormon feminist protest: And why I won’t be there.”

  1. Jeremy

    It really comes down to one question.
    Do we hold God’s priesthood authority?
    If no, then what are we withholding from women? Nothing but something made up by man.
    If yes, then who has the say in who holds it and when? The answer is God, not man.

    Reply
    • Merethemum

      Said perfectly. It’s either truly given by God…or it’s not. If it’s not, then it’s not worth having, if it is…then ultimately the Prophet has the keys and through “inspiration from God” makes the final call.

      I have no problem with asking the question…just with not listening to the answer.

      Reply
      • pvs

        Agreed. My understanding is that the prophet makes decisions based on inspiration and through revelation. So, it’s not like the prophet could just decide to change it only because so women in the church are upset about “not having” the priesthood.

    • Nish

      I really appreciate the points you bring up in this post. I have had the special opportunity to interact closely with many young women who are struggling to discover their identity in the world today. I am a feminist in that I am committed to the cause of women gaining freedoms in order to live to their potential, a potential that is comparable to men’s. However, too often I see women confuse their identity with that of a role. The problem with this is that roles are changeable, we fill them as necessary, and we benefit from them ONLY IF we develop an identity separate from them in the first place. Then, we can learn from those responsibilities, fulfill them without feeling as though our identity is threatened when we don’t excel in them.

      I do not think women need to expand the roles they play in order to strengthen their identities or opportunities. There is a danger of thinking that expanding our roles build our identity as it encourages a superficial understanding of who you are- depending on how well you play the part. I am so grateful for the Relief Society which encourages women to develop fundamental traits and discover their strengths that will help them succeed in whatever role they are asked to play, some which are inevitable. Whether it is a mother, or a leader in the church through callings, a working woman, a student pursuing higher education, a daughter, sister, wife etc, the Gospel aims to help us discover how worthwhile we are to God regardless of how successfully we accomplish certain roles. It is just not about the roles.

      The different roles we play in the Priesthood are not limiting to our growth or our potential. However, it does create a balance of power and a incentive to learn from each other and trust one another.

      If this is imperfect in my personal ward or stake, then I aim to strengthen the balance. My reason of why “i won’t be there” is because I do not agree with the solution that OW presents. It is an empty victory. I do not think we are incapable of filling those roles and I do not see church leaders or doctrine suggest that we are incapable of being effective in those roles. Quite the contrary: we have a different task to fulfill. I think there is a serious force attacking women’s worth. But who we are doesn’t depend on what superficial roles we play. It depends on what we make of the responsibility we are given.

      Reply
      • laurellakey

        This comment hits directly what I’ve been feeling and couldn’t quite express myself. It’s not the roles that give us worth, we have worth by just existing as sons and daughters of God.

        Well put, and appreciated. Thank you!

      • CPerri

        WOW, so well said, thank you for your comment! You articulated the thoughts and feelings of my heart

    • Matthew Davidson

      According to the Bible, every believer/saved person is a member of a “royal priesthood” but the human offices of priesthood were taken over completely by Jesus. Jesus is the only person who occupies an office of priest, thus the only one who can save, and forgive sins. The Aaronic order is no longer occupied by humans, and Jesus is the only high priest in the order of Melchizedek.

      Reply
      • Paul

        When Jesus asks us in the bible to become like Him and The Father, is it just limited to how man reads and interprets the bible. I know it isn’t. Seek and study the bible more and you will find that all the answers are there but it is like finding a needle in a hey stack. That is why Heavenly Father created a plan that is based around Jesus. When I study the life of Jesus he was baptized and the Holy Ghost fell upon him like a Dove. He asks each of us to be baptized just like he was. There are hundreds of Thousands of SAVED people with different opinions on how to do this ordinance. And many other points of doctrine. (Confusing) Everyone is saying my saving is better than yours, because ……. Jesus asked us to become ONE with HIM and the FATHER. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to know that all of these SAVED children of his are not doing his will. Read the bible more intently and ask the Father in Jesus name to have further understanding to know which church Truly Carries Our Saviors name and his Priesthood. There is only one, all other churches are appendages to the true and living church of OUR GOD THE ETERNAL FATHER of us ALL.
        Pray intently and the spirit will bring you to remembrance.
        His will will be done on Earth as it is in Heaven…

        God bless

  2. Daniela

    It is evident that the writer has never taken a gender/women’s class.

    Like many people, this woman is talking about the small portion of feminism that the media loves to focus on: the crrrazy straw feminist who thinks she is better than a man! This is CERTAINLY not what feminism is about. Beyonce gives a good definition of feminism:
    http://s1083.photobucket.com/user/ZerlinaMaxwell/media/tumblr_mxweutQN7B1qlf1v0o1_500_zpsa72ddace.gif.html
    What does this mean?! It means that yes, women and men are obviously different, physically, but everything else is most likely constructed by society. Why can’t a woman be a priest? Why is it such an issue for a woman to be a leader? Girls need female leaders to look up to, so they are able to understand that they can be anything they want to be.

    Also, gender and sex are very different things. Femininity is not directly correlated with female. You can be male and be feminine or be female and he masculine.

    Why does it make you sad that the couple won’t disclose their child’s gender? Does it affect you? No, no it doesn’t. If anything that kid won’t be subject of society’s construct of gender and will most likely have an open mind!

    I can go on and on. But all I have to say is that this post is sexist and extremely closed-minded.

    Reply
    • Heather

      You are wrong and the author of this article is right… Sorry buddy…. You don’t understand what it means to be a woman or the wonderful blessings that come with being a woman. There are things that are meant to be gender specific. And no matter how much people want this to be untrue and to change it, it will not change. Men and women are different and not only physically. we are different and that difference is not degrading at all! It is beautiful and it is what makes important things like life, marriage, families, and relationships possible. Women are strong, beautiful and capable beings! We are capable of doing many many things. This post said nothing about woman not being able to be leaders… You pulled that one out of thin air! You are a lost and confused woman who does not understand her divine nature. If knowing what a woman is and what my role is as a woman is being closed minded then I am glad to put my name next to this womans. Your definition of an open mind is to be lost and confused and searching for truth. I hope you find truth and one day find out what it means to be a woman.

      Reply
      • Debbie Hill

        Heather – So… you are aware that in the early days of the church, the relief society held the power to anoint and bless the sick. Right? So… let’s talk about “gender specific” again in light of that. This “power” was taken away sometime after the dedication of the St George temple. So it went on for several years.
        You are right, this author is right, and the women who are simply asking if this loss was due to a revelation or (like with the blacks and the priesthood) this was simply a reaction to a societal “norm” that did not come from God are also right. It could be a fair question. What is the harm in asking? Questioning truths does not make one “lost and confused” the only way to get answers is to ASK. (just ask Joseph Smith!)

      • Rose R. Retalik

        @Debbie,
        “you are aware that in the early days of the church, the relief society held the power to anoint and bless the sick. Right? So… let’s talk about “gender specific” again in light of that. This “power” was taken away sometime after the dedication of the St George temple. So it went on for several years.”

        Please provide your references for this statement.

        “and the women who are simply asking if this loss was due to a revelation or (like with the blacks and the priesthood) this was simply a reaction to a societal “norm” that did not come from God are also right. ”

        We don’t know why the Blacks had the Priesthood Denied. It is only your OPINION that it was because of “social norms”.

        “. What is the harm in asking? ”

        They have asked, and they have been answered. They don’t like the answer so they continue their “protest”…

      • Bettie

        Heather, you can’t accuse either one of being “right” or “not right” because they both bring up valid points and express their opinions. So, who are you to say whether their view or opinion is right or wrong simply because it may differ from yours? As someone exploring this topic of debate who can see truths and questions in BOTH the article AND the comment you are replying to, I’ve never been given a response that EXPLAINS why women don’t have the priesthood and WHY they shouldn’t want it. I got it. No one should be an extremist and the author doesn’t want the priesthood. But when asked this question all I’ve heard from people is “women have many responsibilities, too” and we are beautiful and strong and have purpose and have divine nature. Yeah, I already understand that. I want the facts. That’s all that person is trying to say. And quite frankly you are being incredibly judgmental and close-minded yourself. This person is voicing her opinion on a heavily debated topic. You have no right to accuse this individual of being lost and confused and not knowing the truth about her divine nature. Because what if she did? that’s not your place or your business so back off. Everyone’s “divine nature” is different and obviously your strong point is not uplifting others, nor is mine. It is shallow minded people like YOU not them that put out horrible stereotypes about LDS women who sit there and attack someone for being “wrong” about their opinion because it differs from yours and calling people “confused” and “lost” and accusing them of “not knowing what it is to be a woman” and that they don’t understand their “divine nature”. You need to take a hard look at yourself and your imperfections before you point out those in others.

    • Sue

      You’re quoting Beyonce? Honestly, take a Woman’s Studies course yourself!

      Reply
    • Brittney

      I agree. I’ve only had a few gender classes, but even I can see that she’s missing the point.

      Reply
    • vahine

      Daniela. Since when do have to take a gender /women’s class to know how to be women? And Beyoncé?! Seriously? You’re credibility’s out the door as soon as you try & pose her as a woman expert! When I need to learn the skills of getting drunk & doing a blow job @ the back of a limo I’ll ask her for her advice.

      Reply
      • Bettie

        To be fair, she wasn’t posing her as a woman expert. She found a quote that she found agreeable that Beyonce happened to say. And that little tidbit you threw in there about skills in getting drunk and doing a blow job had absolutely nothing to contribute to this discussion whatsoever. Grow up.

    • Forrest Phelps-Cook

      The author is NOT saying women shouldn’t be leaders and in fact in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints women ARE put into many leadership roles. Not holding the priesthood does not diminish a woman’s ability to be a leader, mentor and example.

      Reply
    • Wendy

      Why does a woman have to hold the priesthood to be a leader? What makes that the key to setting an example to young girls? Women hold leadership roles all throughout the church and have the ability to set awesome examples to girls. I have been exposed to many of those women throughout my life. My Young Women leaders impacted my life and still make a difference today and it’s been decades since I was a teen. Relief Society Presidents have done the same. There are SO many opportunities for women in the church to be great role models and to show girls they can be anything they want to be. Men and women have distinctly different roles as defined by the Lord. This does not in anyway make one gender less than the other. The Lord is also clear on that. He is a God of order and we have different tasks to perform. To me, it’s just that simple. Personally, I am glad I do not have the priesthood. While that comes with many blessings, it also comes with an incredible responsibility. I personally feel that women who need the priesthood to feel “equal” truly do not understand the gospel.

      Reply
      • Bettie

        This is really well said and I agree, but could you please be more specific in regards to what those leadership opportunities are and how they help women have an important and equally strong role in the church?

      • Tracy Edwards

        As a latter-day saint. I believe that women are supporters of the priesthood. We don’t need to have the priesthood. As married couples we hold close to the priesthood.

    • Beth J Mahalak

      the fact that you used Beyonce as a role model to quote good female values says it all beause she is such a wonderful imdoest indecent vulgur woman she makes women look bad and yes it is sad that a family hides a childs gender and makes them scared and lonely because this child will not be able to say i am woman and proud or i am a man and happy you are either male or female be happy with what god made you at least you did not use mily cyrus as an example

      Reply
    • Louise

      Exactly. So well said my friend.

      Gender is a made up social construction.

      Reply
      • Louise

        and by that I meant well said my friend to daniella.

      • chefwife

        Louise- If she were your friend you would have spelled her name correctly. Secondly, gender is part of who we were before this life, during this life and after this life. It is not made up or a social construct.

    • Jessica

      First off, you should listen to a Beyonce song before you go citing her as a credible female role model.
      Secondly, “why is it such an issue for a woman to be a leader?” There are a ton of leadership positions for women in the church! And those women, such a my young womans president and my advisers have had a lot more influence in my life than my bishopric, or any other male leader. And they did it without the priesthood.

      Reply
      • Debbie Hill

        Yes… any woman can be a leader in the church, but only under the direction of their Priesthood leader.
        Your argument is invalid.
        The ONLY argument that will solve this is a prophet saying “God said so”. And we have not heard that.

      • Ann

        Debbie Hill, did you not listen to last conference? Or was the answer then not loud enough for you? It was already answered. The answer was no. That was made abundantly clear. Over and over again, actually. OW basically stuck their fingers in their ears & said, “We can’t hear you!”

        Their mission statement pretty much states, they won’t stop until they get what they want. They don’t care about God’s will.

        And THAT is my problem with them.

    • Debbie Roberts

      Daniela, study after study after study has shown that gender is not a social construct. In fact it is primarily biological or in other words the majority of us have our gender hardwired into our genes. In the 70′s some research was done by raising girls with boy toys and boys with girl toys. The majority of the time the girls would treat the action figure like a baby and the boys would use the doll as a weapon. There are always exceptions to the rule but our genes tend to be our masters. There have been multiple studies since and they all tend to have a similar outcome. Infants born with ambiguous genitalia are always genetically tested now for their bological sex since the old way of allowing parents to pick whatever gender they wanted and raise them accordingly didnt work. I know gender studies programs treat science as irrevelant you likely will too.

      Reply
    • Todd Jackson

      Actually in college we are learning that what the author said is correct. It is more than just physical attributes that makes men and women different. It is in the heritable characteristics of our DNA that makes us masculine or feminine. There are a few exceptions out there, but they are always the exceptions to the vast majority. The scientific truth is men and women are different. And thats ok!

      Reply
    • chefwife

      Daniela- Ironically you quote a pop star, not a great world or religious leader, but a woman who sings about women running the world. And yes men and women are very different in many more ways than just physical. Good created women to bear and raise children, to be nurturing and compassionate. Men were created to be protectors and breadwinner. We are fundamentally different but our society has blurred the lines. Just because this practice is accepted does not mean it is right.

      Reply
    • Zachary Moss

      Sadly you are deeply wrong…this protest is an act of pure rebelliousness nothing more than that. contention is the work of the devil and his hands are all over this protest…if you cannot see this you have been blinded ….if this offends you think about it and pray and see who’s voice you’re paying attention to is its Gods or man? ” In the latter-days even the elect of god will fall”! this brings me to tears thinking how many sweet sisters will fall away from the lords gospel because of pure pride …..so very sad

      Reply
    • Cassidy

      Daniela,

      As you pointed out that the writer has likely never taken a class on gender /women, I would like to point out that you have likely never had a child or watched closely a child’s development from very early in life. If you had, you would observe that society actually does not play as big of a role as you might assume. I would challenge you to spend some time around a group of children around the age of one and observe how they play and interact. You will likely see a very keen difference, and you may also notice they really don’t care about society at all at that age.

      Keeping gender a secret and dressing your baby in green and yellow doesn’t produce an open minded child. Children are born open minded, and they’re not threatened by their own gender or sex.

      Reply
    • themeanmama

      She doesn’t need to be an expert or even have studied “women’s studies” to voice her opinion. You, however, should at least familiarize yourself with the Mormon church before giving advice. In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, holding the Priesthood or being a Priest is not the same as being a Priest/Pastor/Preacher in another church.
      We have female leaders and a large Women’s group. Women who are of our faith and are fighting for “Equal Rights” do not understand their divine role, and that is very sad.

      Reply
    • Zach

      Beyonce is a terrible definition of feminism. The author doesn’t need to take any class on the study of women or roles of women or feminism at all in order to understand basic equality like she talked about. The author was great in making this post non political but I can’t help but imagine the “woman gender” class you probably took was from a sexist liberal. Not only are women different from men physically like you said but they’re different emotionally and spiritually. You don’t understand, this post wasn’t sexist at all. “Does it affect you? No, no it doesn’t.” How do you know? You don’t. What you said is opinion but that is fact. You do not know. What you especially don’t understand is that you cannot change Gods mind. You can’t. You cannot change His mind. This is all about His commandments and what He intends us to do. You have no say in that. That is why women can’t hold the priesthood and men can’t deliver babies. Because GOD wanted it that way. Your comment was not only disrespectful but ignorant and blatantly out of touch with the purpose of the article.

      Reply
    • bob

      Daniela,
      I am not sure why woman need the priesthood to have someone to look up to. There have been many, many woman who have not held the priesthood that are a role model. I was not aware that things changed in order to have role models.

      Reply
  3. SuKonie

    Close-minded is an insult used when someone doesn’t have enough of an open mind to take a look at an opposing viewpoint and admit that it is an opposing viewpoint but none-the-less valid because it is held by someone else who has their own experiences, education, and background that legitimizes their views. I get really tired of the put-downs just because…
    Seekers after truth will find it from the Source of truth which speaks to the Spirit in each of us. Know your Source and you find your Truth. If my Source is better than your Source, we’ll find out in the end but don’t put down those you don’t agree with. As for me, I am one of millions of women who know where Kayla’s coming from.

    Reply
  4. Joe Meservy

    Well said. As a man and a husband (and a father), for me this is an uncomfortable topic to have rise up in the press. I am writing to say thank you for explaining your views/beliefs so clearly and kindly–I enjoyed your post and look forward to your bright future. Reading this, I feel that you have been taught values and morals that can uplift others. (P.S. Obviously you do indeed have strength in writing.)

    Reply
  5. Jessica

    I agree wholeheartedly with you Kayla! :D Wonderful article!! And Daniela, we do have women leaders to look up to, just that they do not exercise the same responsibilities as priesthood holders, as Kayla said. If you’d like to learn more, go to here: http://www.mormon.org/me/DGS0/AlyLarsen

    Reply
  6. lauren

    Not sure why the Ordain Women group is even protesting a church that they clearly dont believe in

    Reply
    • Debbie Hill

      learn what the Ordain Women movement is before you comment. They are not protesting a church. They are asking for a revelation. An answer to a question that has never, in documented history, been asked of God.
      The answer doesn’t make the church any more or less true … but could calm the hearts of thousands of our sisters. I see no harm in asking.

      Reply
      • Ann

        You think the prophet hasn’t asked?
        All of those talks that gave the answer no (albeit a little too gently, since these women apparently need it pounded into them), weren’t enough of an answer for you? Listen closley this time.

      • chefwife

        They have asked many times and the answer is always no. They need to accept that and move on. And by “asking for revelation” they are protesting the doctrine of the Church and trying to get God to conform to their twisted views rather than conforming to God laws and will as we all should.

      • Ifti

        The question has never been asked, Debbie, because the answer for those who have a testimony of the gospel and an understanding of Heavenly Father’s plan is clear. It’s a question that doesn’t need asking. The answer can be found in the Bible and the Book of Mormon. Maybe if you read them your heart would be calmed. What is happening today is eerily similar to what happened in 1st Nephi, back then they called it murmuring and for those of us familiar with the scriptures we all know what happened to Laman and Lemuel…

  7. Paul

    “God’s law doesn’t change just because the world’s opinion does?” The LDS church has a clear history of changing when social pressures mount. African Americans were excluded from holding the priesthood until 1978. Numerous LDS leaders were clear that blacks would not hold the priesthood until Christ returned. Further, Brigham Young and numerous LDS leaders taught that polygamy was required to receive exaltation. President Hinckley condemned polygamy. He stated it was “doctrinally wrong.”

    Denying meaningful leadership to woman is a tradition developed from men and those who blindly follow such ideas.

    Reply
    • Joey

      Check your sources and read them in context. I guarantee you’ll prove yourself wrong.

      Reply
    • Todd Jackson

      Paul, there was no “caving to social pressures” over the priesthood. In fact when the announcement was made TIME magazine did a story on it praising the church, not for finally giving in, but being leaders in the equalization of minorities and whites.
      Your numerous leaders who claimed it wouldn’t happen yet must have either been taken out of context or not understood clearly the plan Heavenly Father has.
      In fact I can only think of one leader who made that statement and he was personally involved in the process that resulted in the ensuing revelation. How great that we can be part of a church where when the great people who lead it find they were wrong about something they repent themselves and embrace the truth as revealed to them.

      Reply
    • chefwife

      Paul- Though you may be well intended, your points are very inaccurate. Nowhere in the doctrine of the Church does it say the things you mention. Good does not change His doctrine to appease men, women, or our corrupt society as a whole. Yes, some of the Church’s policies change from time to time but Never the doctrine for God is unchanging as are His laws.

      Reply
    • Anonymous

      I am a 13-year-old boy and the president of my deacon’s quorum. I don’t claim to be smarter than you, but I have an issue with you argument about African Americans and the priesthood. African Americans were not granted the priesthood because of society’s views on the matter. This was never church doctrine (I did a little research), and this policy changed when society did. Pretty sure that there was no divine revelation that was involved here.

      And I could give multiple examples (more than two, at least, which is how many you gave) about the Church keeping its standards, despite “social pressures.” One, for example, is not giving women the priesthood (which is the whole debate here). My parents teach me that both genders have important roles, and I can see that many women on these comments have already mentioned that their Young Women leaders had a much greater impact on their lives than did their bishop. I won’t give you any more examples, however. My hands are tired from typing, and I think if you really wanted to know, you could find more examples.

      I’ll end this with saying what I said in the beginning: I am a young deacon, and I don’t know what it feels like to be a women in the Church. I will never be denied the priesthood unless I am not living worthily (yet another responsibility of holding the priesthood). But I know that, even though I will never have the privileges or responsibilities of being a female in the Church, I don’t really want to; I have been assigned the roles of a male before I was born. I rest my soapbox, have a good day.

      Reply
      • Zach

        Anonymous-you are exactly right.

        I can’t express how glad I am that there is more than just me and my seminary teacher who know that it was never a doctrine of the church to not allow blacks the priesthood.

        I’m 17, I have been studying this for three years.

        There isn’t a single document in church history that has barred blacks from having the priesthood. Ever. Joseph Smith himself baptized some black men and ordained the priesthood to them (I have a reference but I can’t think of it off the top of my head.) But like you said, it was the pressures of society that swayed the church and its leaders in the direction they went for so long.

        I will never question God for that particular reason. Because usually if it seems wrong, its mans problem, not His.

    • Bettie

      I’ve often heard the saying “the doctrine and principles of the church are perfect but the people are not”.

      Reply
  8. A.R.

    Just wondering…Did black men ever protest outside the temple to try to get the church leaders to let them hold the priesthood? Did black women ever protest outside church headquarters to get the church leaders to let them into the temple? I don’t think so. I think they prayed and waited.

    Reply
    • Melissa

      There were actually ,any, many letters written to church leaders asking for those changes to take place. There is nothing wrong with asking questions in a church that “We believe all that God has revealed, all that he does now reveal, and we believe he will yet reveal many great and important things pertaining to the kingdom of God.”

      Reply
      • Ann

        Except it is not a question, it’s a demand. One that has already been responded to.

    • Todd Jackson

      A.R. no there were no public organized protests. The letters written were all private and kept close to the hearts of the writers and recipients.

      Reply
    • Joe

      And you think that is somehow good and noble? They should have. Maybe it would have happened decades sooner.

      Reply
    • Bettie

      Being black and not protesting has nothing to do with this discussion.

      Reply
      • Ann

        It does when people keep referencing them as a reason to still move forward with the OW agenda. They keep bringing them into it, so people are responding.

  9. Tod

    Men and Women are different. We are supposed to be. We have different roles and responsibilities. We think, act, and react differently. However, we are not just different, the differences make us Complementary. We fit together like two jigsaw pieces. Where one is weak the other is strong. Where one needs help, the other is there to support. A husband and wife, is more, is better, is greater than just a man and woman. We NEED each other, we are supposed to. We can’t do it alone, we are NOT supposed to. Most of the time we as humans are too stubborn to learn this lesson. Once we learn that having a partner makes us better and stronger, we understand that God does the same for us. When His piece of the puzzle, fits in with ours, we become much more. Man needs woman, and woman needs man, and both need God. Neither are superior to the other, but both are inferior before God, and both NEED His help. We are not each one half of a whole, we are less than that. We must each fit our piece to the other, and only then can we together fit our two pieces to Gods. This is why we are different, this is why we are complementary. This is the lesson we are to learn.

    Reply
  10. HMHC Mafi 'o Amerika Samoa

    This world turns and function because we (men and women) are different and bestowed special talents and responsibilities unique to one another … as a US Marine Corps combat veteran, I thought for your (feminist included) to ask for any privileges … and the right of the Mormon Church deny any of its God Authorized privileges to anyone … both male and female … ssshhhh … I can’t have mine either (yet) but I have 24 hour access to the priesthood …

    Reply
  11. Kim

    Wow, this is truly a controversial subject. I enjoyed reading about both sides and decided…Hummmm maybe just pray about it….

    Reply
  12. Delirious

    I really feel that by nature, men are better fitted to be Priesthood holders. I’ve had enough responsibility in the church to see the weight of burden that is carried by the Bishop of the church. Because of his nature, he carries that burden differently than a woman would.

    I think women who want the Priesthood do not appreciate or understand the male psyche. I believe these women should spend some time talking to a man about how the Priesthood helps males. I’ve had these conversations, and I can tell you that the mens’ answers will be surprising to these feminists.

    I have never felt that I was less because I didn’t hold the Priesthood. In fact, I have always felt revered and honored by the Priesthood brethren with whom I’ve served. I have always felt that my opinion was weighed equal with their’s in Priesthood councils.

    Most importantly, I’ve had PLENTY of work to do in the church. PLEASE don’t give me the Priesthood and give me more responsibility! :)

    Reply
    • Merethemum

      lol…I feel the same way about the extra things I’d have to add to my to do list is we also had the Priesthood. No thanks…I grumble about getting my visiting teaching done and preparing a primary lesson…I’m all about the easiest path! ;-)

      Reply
  13. Louise

    Hi there,

    I appreciate that you’re questioning pieces of social movements, that’s so important. However; you’ve missed a major point. Gender is a SOCIAL CONSTRUCT. It is completely made up. Yes we have biological sexes, that is true. But Gender in our culture has been construed to be a dyad. Our culture perpetuates this fallacy that there are only two genders, and you’re one or the other– but in reality it is a spectrum. Many other cultures recognize third and even fourth gender categories. When we talk in such absolutes in the name of equality we are actually marginalizing and rejecting so many people.

    I see it as that gender is not who you are, but what you do. It is constructed by culture. It is our responsibility, as humans and as feminists to recognize gender as a social construction and the reality of its complexities. The majority of us are cisgendered, meaning we were assigned the gender at birth that we identify with (having female reproductive organs, higher estrogen and also feeling like a woman). But not everyone has that luxury. There are women who are born with male genitalia. Imagine how you would feel if you looked down and saw a penis. That is what it is like for transwomen. This is so important to recognize. Gender is a spectrum. When we work for social progress in such absolute terms we are unintentionally excluding a whole group of marginalized people. Just something to consider.

    Really we are all just trying to navigate through this uncertain world. We all share the joys and burden of culture. Culture can often leave so many of us feeling uncertain, unfulfilled and unhappy. Awareness is key. Just something to keep in mind. Thanks! Sorry that turned into a little bit of a rant; I am passionate for gender equality for everyone. Not just men and women :)

    Reply
    • Sarah

      I think you may be confusing gender roles with actual gender which is a biological fact. Gender roles however are a construct of our society. Everyone is different and should be who they are, but this is a religion question. If they don’t believe in the religion anymore, they are free to leave. If they do, then you follow the rules and abide by the hierarchy because that is what you signed on for. Feminism is sometimes mistaken for women saying or acting like they are better than men, but that is not what true feminism is about. Feminism is about equality in regards to jobs, voting rights, saying no to sex, having freedom to be your own person regardless of your genitalia. Their are still inequalities between genders in this world. That is a reality. However, many claiming feminism go to far the other way in their quest for power. Feminism asks for equality, nothing more or less. This is a religion though and thus it is not up to them to decide or argue. They have the choice to leave a church, that it seems to me, they no longer agree with. :)

      Reply
  14. Starla jones

    Don’t women already hold the priesthood? They can go to the temple without being ordained. They officiate there without being ordained.

    Reply
      • tmes

        Women perform the washing and anointing ordinance for other women. They anoint, lay their hands on their heads and pronounce the blessings. They also accept the tokens during the endowment ceremony from the other women. It is also stated in the endowment ceremony that the women have the potential to become priestesses to their husbands. Why would we be told we can become a priestess if there is not a place for us in the priesthood? How can so many endowed men & women not know the answer to that question? I have asked my mother, my RS president and everyone else I dare to ask who is endowed. NO woman in the church has an answer for that question. That is my question. What is the priestess potential??? Do you know?

        It does not have to be the same as men, but it does deserve to be defined for all the women who are paying attention to what is being said and what they are doing when they are at the temple.

      • Kathy

        In my humble opinion… I think if I make it to that exalted state where I am a priestess to my husband/co-creator/Goddess over my own world(s), it would require a change or a power I don’t currently possess. I doubt I’d be able to be the Spirit Mother of billions of Spirit children without an added measure of power, and that may take place in the form of a “priesthood” power, whatever that may mean for a goddess or priestess.

        I only know, that in this life, on this planet, I don’t need to create worlds or billions of spirit children so I don’t need that now, but look forward to finding out what that may mean in the eternities. For now, I have faith that the Lord is in control and communes with His Prophet when He wants to impart further light and knowledge unto us. “Line upon line, precept on precept, here a little, there a little” and “Bloom where you’re planted”.

  15. Maren Greathouse

    Okay, so I would like to share my thoughts. I have great respect for the author’s clear message regarding her relationship to the role of woman. The categories of woman and man are ones that are highly contested and culturally relative, but have endured through time. Her experience is distinctly hers, and she is self-possessed….choosing to engage in a partnership with someone of a different and complimentary role to build a life together. Many, many cultures observe this idea of duality and believe this to be ordained by a higher power. I can dig her investing herself in something that speaks to her. But, that is not the experience of all women and should be respected as a personal decision, but not as a companion reader to the elusive-but ever palpable- “Guidebook for Wayward Mormon Girls”. The category of “woman” is one that is culturally relative. All woman perceive the category of “woman” as more than a role, a role that is informed by many spirtual and secular influences. It is also how we choose to see ourselves (1) in relation to other women (because you are only perceived quiet if someone else is louder than you, only powerful is someone else is more submissive) (2) how we choose to present and perform our gender- as powerful, quiety, dainty, sporty….and what attributes we attribute to “femininity” or “masculinity” (read: if a woman is powerful, is she being masculine? If a man is sensitive, is he feminine?). How did these traits become essentialized as masculine or feminine in the first place and who do they benefit? (3) in relationship to our relationship to power. Can a woman be legitimately a “woman” if she does not marry? does not have kids? does not participate in the traditional path? Is her role only intelligible through her relationship with a man, or can she be a subject in her own right. I say this because it is important that we think more about the way our faith can be further realized, not modified to align with secular thinking. Faith grows. Love grows. Love reveals truths to us. No, woman and men are not the same, but the argument I would present to this author is whether these roles- of man/woman- are pre-ordained? And, if so, who determined that and why can it not be further defined and redefined? For the women who are barren, who do not find love, for the woman who loves another woman, for the woman who does not align with traditional interpretations of what that category means….where do they belong? Where is their place? Where is their value from your viewpoint? Seeking the priesthood is not about a aggressive demand for power unless you decide to interpret it that way. I intepret it as a woman no longer allowing her voice to be silenced because she does not want to participate in this very specific, very particular idea of male/female and the pre-ordained categories that you intrepret those to mean. You are using your voice here. Let them use theirs.

    Reply
    • Stacie

      Okay this is all crazy. In my whole life have I ever felt less then a man because I’m a women NO! Everything I’ve every worked for I’ve accomplished. This whole gender thing is stupid if you ask me. No matter what people say black is black, pink is pink, white is white, women are women and men are men. I hear your complaints about not feeling equal because your a women. Maybe instead of searcher for something that is for men you should look deeper and figure out why this is so important to have when you already have that blessing. The first thing that screams to me is Satan is winning and he is destroying your family. I know some of these ordained women and we’ve had deep discussions and they don’t even know why they want the priesthood. They changed their reason every time I had something to say. These women are blinded by the ways of Satan. He is good and he knows right where to attack families. Be careful what you wish for because one day you’ll look back and wonder what on earth happened to me and my family. Also if this was a way to go about it then why do we pray, fast and council with the lord. These women have no right to destroy something so wonderful and sacred. These women can’t say they believe in the teaching if they are protesting.

      Reply
      • Pat

        How is this a reply at all to what Maren had to say? I’m really confused. Did you even read it Stacie? Also, pink is pink, but how many different shades of pink are there? Life is not so simple, and your pink experience isn’t the same as someone else’s. Just because someone doesn’t agree with you doesn’t mean it’s “from Satan”.

    • Jennifer

      Thank you, Maren. A thoughtful reply. I only wish the author had been as rigorous in her thinking.

      Reply
  16. Linda

    Only allowing only men to hold the priesthood creates a position of dependency for women. If my priesthood holding husband is away on business, if I am a single or divorced mother, or if my husband doesn’t hold the priesthood, I have to depend on another man to give me and my family priesthood blessings. Why can’t I just depend on myself? What if I feel uncomfortable calling another woman’s husband to come to my house to give blessings? I gave these babies life; I should be able to give them a healing blessing? Why should I have to depend on man to do it for me? I shouldn’t.

    Reply
    • Ammon Crossette

      You will always depend on another man for priesthood blessings. His name is Jesus. If you don’t like it, maybe you should work on that.

      Reply
      • Linda

        Yes, but I would like to depend on Jesus without going through another man. After all, He is my Savior, not just my husband’s or home teacher’s.

      • Leah Christensen

        @Linda Precisely! If I need a blessing, I’ll ask Jesus. I don’t need someone to ask him for me. Why should I be more in need of someone in the home doing it, than my husband? Why shouldn’t he have a priest in the home?

        It would make sense though, if people felt they needed someone to minister to them, for husbands and wives to be able to minister to each other! Why should I have a priest in the home, but he has to call in someone else?

      • Ammon Crossette

        Linda you’ve missed my point. As a mother and follower of the gospel you need not ever depend on another human being for any blessings you are worthy of. The priesthood power will never heal your sick child. Only faith and God’s will can do that. The priesthood is merely a vessal to help those who lack their own conviction. If you are worthy to have such ordained power, you will never need to call upon it for miracles to happen. You simply need to ask. The answer depends on your faith and God’s will alone. A blessing from a worthy priesthood holder does not guarantee any success outside the bounds of a person’s own faith, and God’s will to oblige.

    • geeper

      I have been divorced for 15 years and have raised 5 children on my own, their father was ex-communicated and his family hates me…and I mean vile hatred toward me and my children. I have had more spiritual experiences, more insight and more blessings given to me because I have learned to depend on my Father in Heaven and Jesus Christ. I have had the experience of being able to pray for a sick child and have them healed without giving a priesthood blessing, but through my faith and the faith of that child. I have also had good home teachers and not-so-good ones who were available to give a blessing when I asked for one.
      Just because you are a single woman, single mother or widow doesn’t mean that you can’t rely on your Father and your older Brother to help you when you need it. Didn’t Jesus tell us that a sparrow cannot fall from the sky that the Father doesn’t notice? Why do you think that He doesn’t know your needs, desires, and fears? Do you honestly think that a loving Father in Heaven wouldn’t want to comfort and bless you? All you have to do is ask Him…as he has said and promised.

      Reply
    • chefwife

      Linda- Men who hold the priesthood cannot give themselves blessings. They, too, need to turn to other men. It is good for us to need and serve one another. This builds trust and a sense of community.

      Reply
    • Melinda

      The Priesthood Power is to teach everyone about the laws of service, a lesson for both men and women. As it’s been said a man can’t give a blessing of healing or ordination by himself, he must humble himself and ask someone for help, therefor giving that person an opportunity to serve and exercise the priesthood. As a women we’ve been asked to humble ourselves as well and give others opportunities to serve. Since i was young my parents taught me the service and charity are both two way principles. Yes it is good to have the desires to serve and help but we must also give opportunities for others to serve us. You are asking to take away the men’s service to you because you’d rather do it yourself and not bother anyone, but a true disciple of God willing to exercise His power wouldn’t see blessing you or your family as a burden. It’s meant to be a gift of service sealed with God’s greatest power, His love. Showing that in the church we aren’t alone. We just have to be able to accept the gift of service.

      Reply
    • Rose R. Retalik

      @Linda,
      “Only allowing only men to hold the priesthood creates a position of dependency for women.”

      Only if they don’t understand their role and purpose in life and in the Gospel.

      Reply
  17. Jami

    I urge you to research the organization Ordain Women (ordainwomen.org) that you so benignly describe as “some group of feminists” before you pass judgement on the organization or their actions. They are wonderful men and women who are active, committed members of the church and they have a lot of info on their site that is actual doctrine that may surprise you. Gender roles within society and the LDS church are not clearly defined. Just because you don’t want the same opportunities that the women in OW want, does not mean that they should not be allowed to respectfully ask for consideration for those opportunities. Just because its different from how you were taught or how you believe does not make this organization wrong. I respectfully ask you and others who share your beliefs to at least educate yourselves about an organization before you jump so quickly to discredit and disapprove of it. Isn’t that the first step towards bigotry?
    With love and respect,
    Jami

    Reply
    • Stacie

      That interesting that you say read up on it because I’ve heard many people say that as they had out false doctrine during protest. It sounds like the LDS church isn’t what you want to be a part of. The reorganized church has a lot of women with your mind set. I don’t need to read your info because 6 months ago I went through this with more women in your mind set and my prayers were answered with the talks given at conference and other lessons given. I hope and pray that one day your eyes will be opened and that you’ll read our books. Go to LDS.org it has a lot of info there for you.

      Reply
      • NLM

        Why are you telling someone who disagrees with you to leave the church? Is it a member’s role to be encouraging those who don’t agree to leave? I don’t recall ever being taught that, and the behavior is highly disturbing to me.

    • chefwife

      Jami- This is also different from how the women in the OW organization were taught; if they in fact listen in Church, General Conference, and to the scriptures. I have read their website and the only Gospel Doctrine they have are fragments of scriptures with no context or additional witnesses (such as additional scriptures) which means they can manipulate the fragments to their desired message. Many of these women are even performing “priesthood” blessings. This is blasphemous and sinful. They are severely misguided by Satan.

      Reply
    • Amelia

      Jami,

      Just to let you know, the OW( Ordain Women) group IS NOT all members of the church- I personally know a group of them that were past members of the church that LEFT the church. Don’t be fooled by what you hear. In addition whatever you want to call them, to protest outside of general conference ( largest church meeting that is semi-annual) is extreme. I have NO problem and respect their viewpoint and opinion (even though I am a woman in the church and don’t share the same viewpoint or opinion.

      Reply
      • Ann

        Yes exactly what Amelia said. A lot of them have already left the church. Don’t be fooled.

    • Ann

      They aren’t respectfully asking. In fact, they’re not even asking. They’re demanding. There is nothing righteous about that.

      And the answer was already given last conference. If they had bothered to listen they would know that. The fact that they are doing this again, speaks volumes about their true motives.

      Reply
  18. dball55

    Religious brainwashing and indoctrination at its finest! Women in the mormon church, for the most part, really have accepted that the role of a mother/caretaker is equal to…..wait for it– THE POWER OF GOD!!! haha it’s hilarious because if the power of god was actually something to be had, it obviously would blow anything else out of the water AND it would include being a great caretaker, tenderness, etc. Unless you’re trying to argue that your heavenly dad doesn’t have those characteristics…Unfortunately, many of the women in the church are just too blind to see that it is CLEARLY sexist and demeaning to women. Just sad, honestly. Free yourselves from this sexism and having to depend on the men (husbands, fathers, bishops, apostles, etc) and see how much better it is to take responsibility (both good and bad) for yourself in all occasions. Much love to you.

    Reply
  19. dball55

    Religious brainwashing and indoctrination at its finest! Women in the mormon church, for the most part, really have accepted that the role of a mother/caretaker is equal to…..wait for it– THE POWER OF GOD!!! haha it’s hilarious because if the power of god was actually something to be had, it obviously would blow anything else out of the water AND it would include being a great caretaker, tenderness, etc. Unless you’re trying to argue that your heavenly dad doesn’t have those characteristics…Unfortunately, many of the women in the church are just too blind to see that it is CLEARLY sexist and demeaning to women. Just sad, honestly. Free yourselves from this sexism and having to depend on the men (husbands, fathers, bishops, apostles, etc) and see how much better it is to take responsibility (both good and bad) for yourself in all occasions. Much love to you.

    Reply
    • Stacie

      I am free that is something Christ gave us freedom. Freedom to choose (both good and bad). There is no sexism within the church. The only ones making it that way is those who are protesting. I don’t depend on any man. I depend on my lord and savior. My husband and I discuss and decide together as an eternal couple what will happen in our home. I choose for myself what choices I am making. I don’t need to be treated like I can’t take care of myself and I don’t have any man trying to control the way I do things nor the way I think. I’m sorry if someone has made you feel that way but I know the church to be true with all my heart. Things have happened in my life to help me grasp to the doctrine of the church and many hours praying and I know that my lord and savior love me. Responsibility is part of life and I deal with it every day.

      Reply
      • NLM

        Stacie,
        While I may not be part of OW, I have definitely witnessed more sexism in the church than outside of it (I wrote a long post about that earlier in this debate). While you may not have experienced that (I’m glad you haven’t) I’m not alone. There’s a reason so many changes are being made right now.

    • Ann

      Do you even think before you type? Your whole comment was laughable. You just made our point for us. The power of God would be tenderness (yep, we’ve got that), a good “caretaker” by which you mean… nuturing? (Hey look we’ve got that too). And you can bet we believe our father has those traits.

      What’s sad is someone trying to come in and tell me what I believe, when they really have no clue. My husband depends on me just as much as I depend on him. We NEED each other. I am a strong woman, I take responsibility for myself, & on top of that I have a husband who loves & respects me. A husband I can lean on when I need it. And it goes both ways. Funny how that works. Try to keep your condescending attitude in check. You obviously have NO idea what you are talking about.

      Reply
    • chefwife

      Dball55- I am so sorry for the experiences you have had in your life that have caused such great bitterness. I find great joy and peace in my faith, my, marriage, motherhood, and womanhood. And I CHOOSE to be a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, a wife, and a mother. No one forced these things on me or brainwashed me into anything. I exercise my agency daily. I hope you can find greater peace and less bitterness in your life.

      Reply
    • LoLo

      Women have the power to make life. Tell me how that is not THE POWER OF GOD!? Please. And before you judge me, be aware that I am a married woman who is also a very established engineer in a male-dominated field.

      It should blow you out of the water. I can grow humans. My husband can’t. Tell me, where’s the inequality? Just because he can give me a blessing? Ehhh…I don’t feel like I’ve been shortchanged.

      Reply
      • NLM

        What about those of us women who are single and can’t grow humans? The “having children” is a woman’s greatest/divine role in this life is a terrible argument. Have you ever had a really deep heart-to-heart with an LDS woman who is single or infertile? I’ve never met one who wouldn’t find your statement flippant and hurtful.

  20. gigerbopper

    Pardon me for not chiming in on any of the discussion already in play, as lively as it is.

    As I’m mulling over this debate, all I keep thinking about is, I already have all these responsibilities as a woman (wife, mother, nurturer, leader, on and on) and now you want me to take on the Priesthood, too?! Just the thought is exhausting. Perhaps this distinction of gender roles is the Lord’s way of spreading the workload. We’ve got so much to do in our homes, communities and in the church, I’m happy that I am not expected to do it all – and neither is my husband. If I’m limited in what I need to do, I for one am grateful.

    When God decides it’s time for men to start having babies, I’ll gladly take on the Priesthood.

    Reply
    • Michelle Fox

      I feel the exact same way! This reminds me of when I had a very intense conversation with my husband (who is not a Mormon) over gender roles. I told him that either I was a homemaker or I was a working mom, not both. The reason being is that it is too much to try to do everything. If I was to be responsible for the home and for part of the income, both areas will suffer because I will never truly be able to devote myself to one or the other. So in other words, I would be an ok homemaker and ok at my job and an expert in stress. That’s crazy. This is how I feel about the priesthood. If I was to also be responsible for providing priesthood ordinances, then I wouldn’t be a very good member of relief society. I also shutter to think what relief society would be like if men took over (because in reality that is what would have to happen in order to divy up responsibilities). I’m not saying men are not compassionate because they are, it’s just that we think differently and therefore perform compassionate service and leadership differently.

      Reply
  21. Ryan

    Linda said: “Why can’t I just depend on myself? What if I feel uncomfortable calling another woman’s husband to come to my house to give blessings? I gave these babies life; I should be able to give them a healing blessing? Why should I have to depend on man to do it for me? I shouldn’t.” The fact is you would have to call someone’s husband regardless of gender, you cannot give yourself a blessing even if you are a man because the priesthood is meant to serve others in the name of Christ. How can you expect yourself to hold the Priesthood when you don’t even know what it is or what it’s used for?

    Reply
  22. Shannon Lowell Hensley

    I’m just waiting to see who becomes the first group to petition the Elders to let people have their pets sealed to their family. There’s already been some folks bringing them to church on a regular basis, and it’s not just those with age related mental deterioration issues.

    Reply
  23. Janelle

    It is strange to me that you never hear anyone in the Catholic Church complaining about women not being the running (so to speak) when they decide on the next pope or when cardinals are ordained. How is that any different? Why as members of the church are we under so much more pressure to “conform” to what others think. The fact is… THIS IS GOD’S CHURCH, not yours not mine. He has a purpose and a plan for us all. As a woman I don’t feel that He loves me less because I don’t have the priesthood, I actually feel that He loves me more. I think when we truly understand the plan of salvation and know what God’s plan for us is (all you have to do is ask) we will understand why things are the way that they are. Protest till your face turns blue people, the fact is that the Lord won’t change his mind just because you want him to. Just ask Martin Harris how well asking and asking and asking works out.

    Reply
  24. Melissa Marriott

    I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately since the news story about another protest on the upcoming priesthood session. Here is my take. Yes, I’m a woman but I’m going to use a sports analogy, because it fits. Let’s say I’m starting up a two person soccer team. I say that I want to be the goalie…. Except my husband who I’m starting this team up with wants to be the goalie too. So how does that game go? It doesn’t. We both stand in front of the net and well we will lose every time. It only works if one of us is the goalie and one of us is out on the field trying to score on the other team. Does that make me any less important because I’m the goalie? Nope. Does that make him any more important because he’s the offense? Nope. A two person team does not have the same function. What makes me and my husband a perfect team is that we compliment each other and we really do. Outside of who holds the priesthood and who doesn’t, my husband is much better at handling the finances than I am. I’m much better at detail cleaning than he is. He can’t grow a chia pet. I’m good at gardening. We all have our gifts. We are all given exactly what we need to fulfill our function. Women don’t need the priesthood to feel their just-as-important-as-men’s-function function. Maybe the reason I don’t get the protester’s arguments is because I don’t feel oppressed by not having the priesthood.

    Reply
  25. Jeremiah Thomas Baker

    It is all about faith. How many women in the scriptures can you recall, had the authority to act in God’s name? None. Any and all members of God’s congregation (the two-thirds of heaven that followed God instead of Satan) have the agency and authority to act FOR God’s name, but not IN his name. According to the faith, only WORTHY members have the authority to act in His name. I am a priesthood holder, but have been inactive for years, therefore, although I hold the priesthood, I cannot rightfully use it, because I am no longer worthy to do so. That does not mean that I cannot act for God’s name, like standing up for my faith and explaining it to people that even have a good amount of knowledge about the Church. People that have not done extensive research into the LDS faith are WAY in over their heads here, and you stick out in your comments. This really has nothing to do with feminism or gender, much like the original post that Sister Lemmon made. In fact her post is quite insightful to those within the Church. Truth is, women will probably never be able to hold the priesthood and have the authority to act IN his name. God has a sex and gender, they are both male. I have seen that OW have very valid points, but these points dismiss the sole foundation of any belief…Faith. If you have faith that God’s prophet on earth is Thomas S. Monson, than you would also have faith that if women could hold the priesthood, God would have made it so 2000 years ago. And here we are. I find it disheartening to see that so many faithful women in the church are blinded by the actions that they take, and I will tell you why. There are two main outcomes for the OW movement, to ordain and not to ordain. Say the Prophet says, “I have received revelation from God that women are not meant to hold the Priesthood.” Now, all of those women will feel they have been betrayed by the leaders of the LDS Church, and many of them will no doubt leave the church. Second scenario, Prophet says, “After hours of praying, we have received revelation that women, effective immediately, can now hold the priesthood.” Now, we have members like myself that belief that pressures of society can make changes to even the TRUE church of God. Then again, I have Faith enough in my Church to believe that if this happened, I would be able to believe that it was God’s decision and no one else. So, have faith, no matter what, God be with you til we meet again.

    By the way, if this was not made clear, I truly enjoyed this blog, and found it to be a great testimonial of a woman within the LDS Church.

    Reply
  26. PAtty

    It’s confusing ( and sad for me) that this group of sisters who says to belong and believe in this church, doesn’t want to believe in specific revelation given by our Prophets for our time. I believe they are missing a BIG thing here ( and is not women being ordained to the Priesthood). Why not to trust in our leaders? Why not to trust in our beloved prophet? Why not to recieve with contentment what has been given unto us? We all recive the blessings of the Priesthood in the specific line that our loving Heavenly Father has established since the begining. He teaches us with patterns. Remember Adam and Eve?

    https://www.lds.org/manual/eternal-marriage-student-manual/differences-inherent-between-men-and-women?lang=eng

    Reply
  27. Katie

    I have read many of the comments. I have found that both sides present interesting arguments. That being said, I do not support the ordain women group. Not because I think they’re crazy, extremists but because I simply have a different opinion than they do. I did not make this decision lightly. I did not make this decision because I’m brainwashed by my religion. I am a 17 year old Mormon girl who has questioned my faith. I have asked the question why I can’t hold the priesthood. I have struggled with this for a time, even feeling a bit jealous of the boys my age who held the priesthood. In a search for answers, I went directly the source. I asked my Heavenly Father. This very personal and spiritual experience had led me to the conclusion that not holding the priesthood is ok. My self-worth and importance is not dependent on holding the priesthood. Rather than getting hung up on this singular controversy, I choose to follow my faith. I choose to focus my efforts on my relationship with my Father and my Savior. Agency is so very important to the Mormon faith, and how you choose to use your agency is up to you. I respect the ordain women group. While I don’t agree with their position, I can still respect them. This is only my humble opinion. And who knows, maybe things will change. But at this moment in time, I am content.

    Reply
  28. jcyg

    I don’t have a problem with women wanting answers to difficult questions. There are many that I have as well. My problem with the OW movement is:

    1-They are asking for a change that affects all women yet they don’t have the support of even the majority of women. Does that mean they think they know better than all the rest of the women out there? Perhaps we are the ones who are missing the mark then and will thank them at some future date because we are too blind to see things their way.

    2-Only one answer is acceptable. The OW’s stance is that ordination of women to the priesthood is the only answer they are willing to accept. That is problematic on many levels, which would take too long to go into.

    3-Their insistence on attending the Priesthood Session inadvertently accomplishes the exact opposite of perhaps what they intend. What it says is that Relief Society isn’t enough and not the same or equal to the Priesthood Session. I too have a problem with the idea that the Relief Society is often said to be “under” the priesthood authority, not in tandem with or akin to, and that the brethren seem to feel the need to attend RS meetings yet the RS leadership is not invited to attend the Priesthood meetings (I think a female speaker to the priesthood could have something valuable to say as well), but insisting on going to the Priesthood Session essentially slaps the RS in the face. There’s a lot women can do in the RS to affect the world and the energy being used to demand “equality” could be used to make the RS an equal force of power in the world.

    4-The priesthood is not something that can be given by man, but by God. The person then that the OW movement needs to appeal to is not Pres. Monson, but God. Perhaps a prayer vigil would be more effective, one however that is open to answers beside just one. Pres. Monson can’t give women the power even if he said “Tada, you now have it.” Nor can he take away the power that God has already given us. And yes I mean motherhood and no, I don’t mean just motherhood. Women have power by virtue of being a child of God and a woman. There are inherited spiritual gifts. I would love to see the day come back when women can give healing blessings again. I think it goes in tandem with their role as life-givers and nurturers nor is it an ordination in the sense the priesthood is (so it needs not cause an angst), but an ordination to fulfill a calling that women have already been given–to give life.

    I don’t think it’s a mistake that the motto of the RS is Charity never faileth. As I’ve studied charity, I’ve realized it is the most powerful of all the virtues out there. Anyone who has true charity really does rule the world–and more importantly, themselves.

    Thank you for your post.

    Reply
    • courtney

      Thanks for this comment, I am on the fence with this issue and you brought up some important points. See my post below.

      Reply
  29. adam

    “God’s law doesn’t change just because the world’s opinion does.”?
    Tell that to those that have been cursed with dark skin and can’t hold the priesthood because of their poor choices in the before times.

    Reply
  30. nate

    The Priesthood does not make anyone more or less powerful. The Priesthood is extremely conditional. The end of Doctrine and Covenants section 121 in short states that as soon as the Priesthood or any authority is used for anything outside of God’s will then the Priesthood or authority is completely gone.
    The Priesthood puts men into the position of servant not that of supreme overlord. If I were to try and use the Priesthood for personal gain then I have no Priesthood. What I gain from holding the Priesthood is a towel to wash my wife and children’s feet(in reference to Christ’s treatment of his Apostles).
    Blessings are granted according to faith and righteousness. God is just as likely to heal a child because of the prayer of a faithful mother as he is because of a Priesthood blessing.
    Women seem to have a greater tendency toward faith then men do. Faithful women will be exalted even without ever holding the Priesthood. If men were not given the Priesthood I fear that not many men would ever develop the faith necessary for exaltation.

    Reply
  31. madeleinekw

    Reblogged this on shalloozums and commented:
    I agree 100 percent! My dad, who is a Bishop, Says (this isn’t doctrine, it’s a little joke… FYI) that before we came here, God set apart his choicest, most righteous, best spirits, and made them women. He knew the rest of them would need help, so he gave them the priesthood. I am independent, ambitious, and strong willed- much like this lady, and I agree with everything she has written!!!

    Reply
  32. themeanmama

    Loved reading your perspective. I wrote a post as well, several months ago (okay, I was pregnant, so it was over a year ago! time flies), on the same topic, I hope you don’t mind my posting a link. I think the more Mormon who are content with the role they play in God’s plan that speak up the better. It is a shame how many misconceptions there are about this topic. Thanks so much!
    http://mileageofameanmama.blogspot.com/2013/07/i-am-not-my-husbands-equal.html

    Reply
  33. courtney

    What is truly sad about all of this is the division it’s created within our church. I’m not sure why OW is threatening to so many. Why it makes this author “infuriated” – that is such a strong word for a women who has taken Christ’s name. These are her sisters in R.S. she’s talking about, and very likely sits next to on Sundays. No wonder R.S. feels so unsafe to get really personal with regards to weakness or trials. What happened to mourning with those that mourn – something we promise to do when we are baptized?

    While it’s true that men and women are not the same, it’s also true that women are not all the same. We have different childhoods, and life experiences that create biases and different lenses through which we view the world. So why does it make women who are comfortable without the priesthood riled up to see that other women don’t feel the same way? I think it’s fascinating and I love reading about why others have differing opinions than my own. Most often times if I have a genuine interest in understanding before I try to be understood, walls come down and I no longer feel threatened or scared or defensive.

    From what I can tell, women who want the priesthood simply want personal access to something that they once had. They question whether historical cultural pressures changed what used to be. Doctrine has changed and will change, so we can’t be so quick to call case closed over doctrine. These women want to bless their children, each other and their spouses in a way that only a women can, in that nurturing and sensitive way that women are blessed with. Can you imagine how beautiful it would be to participate in an anointing before childbirth, woman to woman – mother to mother? And even calling on a Heavenly Mother in those times?

    I don’t take a stand either way, I’m simply entertained by the dialogue and saddened by the hateful comments. I believe all humans have access to the priesthood power. I don’t believe we need religion, or authority to judge us worthy of or grant us that power. I believe that weather we choose to call upon that power is strictly between us and our Heavenly Parents, but I understand the deep seated convictions of both sides, and hope they can work through this.

    Reply
      • Real Rasta

        @Naomi, @Courtney,
        Even Jesus turned over some tables and used a whip when it was necessary… nothing wrong with being “infuriated” once in a while; especially when it is concerning unrighteousness.

  34. Debajoe

    If it is God’s priesthood, it would seem to me HE should be the one to say who has the authority to hold and exercise it on earth.

    Reply
  35. Tank

    It’s my understanding that women have access to all of the blessings of the priesthood, and it has been speculated that temple ordinances hint that women even hold the priesthood in some form or another.

    Just because women are not authorized to exercise the priesthood in the same way, or officiate in priesthood ordinances, does not prevent them from the same blessing available to men.

    …which brings me to a troubling thought; if all of the blessings of the priesthood are already available to women, is it just the attention & influence that holding priesthood office brings that some desire?

    Reply
    • Leah Christensen

      @Tank This has nothing to do with power, position, or prestige. Any human worthy of the Priesthood should be worthy because of a willing heart and willing spirit, not deemed unworthy of Priesthood Duties because of their gender!

      My Mormon husband and I were talking about this earlier. We both agreed that the Priesthood should be about spirit, not about gender. There’s nothing he can do for me as a Christian that I can not do for him. I say this not because I want a position, but rather to be able to give back to my loved ones and the greater community, exactly what that community gives to me.

      Reply
      • Michelle

        I can see that you have a good intent behind your opinion. I am happy for that. I just don’t understand how you have fixated on the idea that the only way you can give back to the community would be to act under God’s authority? Would you be able to clarify? I may be misunderstanding you, because as I see it, the same question can be an argument for both sides, “If it’s God’s will or word, does it really matter the gender of the authoritative mouth piece?” I can do something really cool that no man will ever be able to do, no matter how much they change themselves or even picket, if they desire to. How do we go there and reason with that gender specific opportunity? We don’t. We just accept it and move on. So, why is accepting the Lord’s will in this gender specific opportunity different? Both were the intents of the Lord, it is done. Pray for understanding if you must, be open to answers, and read the scriptures. Ask & ye shall receive, knock & it shall be opened unto you.

      • Rocket Rasta

        @Leah,
        I’m just glad the Church runs; NOT on what YOU think, but what the LORD thinks.

  36. NLM

    Thanks, Courtney.

    Reading through so many of these comments along the lines of “get out” if you don’t believe, and throwing “following Satan” around for people who see things differently just feels highly disrespectful. What happened to “sisters in Zion”? I’m not part of the movement, but I do believe in open discourse about matters of great importance, and I believe in respecting each other.

    Reply
  37. Reggie Aguiar

    I see sheep everywhere. Optimal examples of why evil men have always been able to get away with the atrocities they have. Adorn evil with some flowers paint it pink and say “It comes from God” and Boom! No questioning whatsoever.

    Reply
    • Ann

      Typical. Take something that is far above your head. You don’t understand it, so everyone that does must be a blind sheep… It couldn’t possibly be that you are too ignorant.

      Try forming a valid argument if you’re going to comment. Spitting out , “You’re all sheep!” only makes you seem small, & weak.

      Reply
  38. Dani

    At the end of the day, it all boils down to the difference between doctrine and policy. Policies change (for example, the lowering of the missionary age for elders and sisters) and doctrine is eternal. This is God’s church and it is not mandated by the precepts of people. If a group of individuals wants to “lobby” the leaders for change, they should take up politics instead.

    Reply
  39. Jennifer

    I recently read an early LDS Young Women’s Journal where Susa Young Gates ( Brigham’s daighter) rebuffed a man’s article in the same issue. The man argued that woman’s power came from her femininity (weak and therefore rescuable, sacrificing, loving etc.) and told the young women of the church to not be “mannish”
    The Gates’ reproof begins with this nugget: “”If we did not know, then it is time we did, that to square our lives by men’s opinions is not the way to bring in the millennium.” She concludes her rebuttal with “God is the father of both (male and female), and giveth gifts to be improved, not hidden in a napkin; it is safe to say to all; follow the bend of your individual tastes and inclinations. Be not ‘mannish’ or ‘womanish;’ be pure, be just, be saintlike; and all will be well with you in this life and in that which is to come.”

    That was 1890 and we are still having arguments about discrete gender traits; the female gender “is inherently gentle and nurturing.” Really?!? What little gentleness and nurturing (my poor kids, I know! But they have a very nurturing dad, so no worries,) I’ve folded into my behaviors have be modeled after a very gentle dad and an amazingly nurturing older brother, along with a lot of practice and work on my part. A lot! I may be a minority among females in the Church, but I’ve come to realize that I’m not alone. How wonderful to know that I, along with every female and male, can learn, model and become more gentle, nurturing, pure and just …you know, like our Savior. Full gratitude for the Atonement and the Gospel of Becoming because I was not born with any of those traits.

    Reply
  40. Isa Hanswille

    I respect your opinion but I just want to point out a couple of things that I’m not sure you know, based on what you’ve said.

    1. The Ordain Women movement is not scary, not subversive, and not unfaithful or irreligious. It is composed of ordinary women like you and I. I know a woman in the movement who was excommunicated in the early 2000s for producing scholarly journal articles about church history. One such article discussed a small, mostly unknown fragment of early church history: that Joseph Smith had revelation concerning the ordainment of women. Dig into this yourself if you don’t believe me. Furthermore, many of the women in this movement are faithful and active members who, in their own discussions with their lord and savior, feel as strongly as their testimonies concerning the ordainment of women. Brushing these feelings of personal revelation aside is akin to pushing aside the testimonies of every member who feels the church is true.

    2. I struggle with the ideology behind “gender roles.” The gender roles we are familiar with derive from our Western heritage — they are not universal constructs but instead span the Western world. In some cultures, men teach children how to run a household. In others, more than two “genders” exist. Perhaps the traditional gender roles you are talking about work for our society because we honestly don’t know how to live any other way, but they don’t work for all societies and at all times. If the church is the true church, then it should be above cultural norms as I believe God would also be above cultural norms. Even throughout Western history, men’s and women’s roles have shifted and are not the same today as in the past. You speak of having a career — this is a relatively new idea for women in our culture and would have been greatly frowned upon merely 100 years ago. 2-3,000 years ago, women were seen as men’s property according to biblical prescriptions. Therefore we see an idea of how gender roles have evolved even in our society. To the Ordain Women movement, they are attempting to further evolve these roles.

    I’m not trying to be disrespectful of your opinion, I just really believe that it is helpful to know both sides to a story before making. a personal decision on it.

    Reply
    • Ann

      If any of those women/men went in for a temple interview right now, they wouldn’t get one. Remember that little thing about affiliating with groups who go against our principles?

      That is a pretty clear indication that what they are doing isn’t right. They have been acknowledged, & they didn’t get the answer they wanted. That isn’t faithfulness.

      Also, they are claiming revelation for the church. That ALL women should receive the priesthood. That’s not personal revelation. Why continue with this farce?

      Reply
      • Naomi

        Ann. Listen to the latest FMH podcast interviewing Kate Kelly and you will get some answers to your questions. Over 70% of the women that have put up profiles on Ordain Women are active, believing members. They have temple recommends, hold callings, and go to church just like you do. That temple recommend question that you mentioned is mostly referring to Polygamist groups.

      • Kathy

        I think that temple recommend question encompasses so much more than polygamy. In fact, when I hear it, I never think polygamy. My mind automatically goes to homosexuality, satanic worship, witchcraft, abortion, open marriages, or any other group who’s practices go against church doctrine. It’s not for us to say, or to judge who is or isn’t worthy of a temple recommend – that’s up to Bishops and Stake Presidents. If I were pushing for priesthood in our church, I would feel uncomfortable in the temple.

        The more society and even members would want to “mainstream” the LDS church, the more “of the world” we would become. We pride ourselves as a “peculiar people” standing as a beacon of light and truth to the world. We are OK with the things that hold us apart from other religions, in fact, we rejoice in it. If we did as OW wants, what is to stand us apart from the rest of the Christian world? The Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints are now the “Community of Christ” and no longer consider the Book of Mormon scripture, just “good reading material”. They believe Joseph Smith was a fallen prophet, and if I’m not mistaken, women do hold the priesthood. Their “temple” is not much more than an office building open to the public.

        Bottom line, “men only” in the Priesthood is fundamental to the true gospel of Jesus Christ, and the foundation of God’s Eternal plan for His children on this earth. The Family: A Proclamation to the World was written almost 20 years ago, so these concepts could be solidified in us in anticipation of the issues of our day. It is no coincidence/accident that the Primary Theme this year is “Families are Forever”, in a time when homosexuality and abortion and yes, OW are such prevalent social issues today. Unless a Prophet receives revelation from God contrary to “men only” in the Priesthood, I won’t question it.

      • Ann

        If they only meant polygamists, it would say that. It is for ANY group, & OW is one of them, whether you like it or not. They can hold a calling, & be doing something wrong.

        If you’re being honest with yourself and your bishop, you would not pass that interview.

      • Dennis Lange

        you are mistaken about temple worthiness. I know of two women who participated last conference’s protest, and they have temple reccommends. Not all the women protesting are members of the church. Of the members protesting, not all of them have temple reccommends. The ones that do not have temple recommends, do not have them for a different reason than this protest.

    • Ann

      Also, I’d be very interested in reading those scholarly journals. If your friend produced them, you should have no problem telling us exactly where to find them.

      Reply
    • Debajoe

      Personal revelation is for you and those things you personally have stewardship over…..not for the entire church. The prophet is the only one who holds the keys to revelation for the church as a whole. Until the prophet tells us that the Lord has ever decided it is time to ordain women, then these women, faithful or not, are going against church doctrine and are not following the Savior any longer. They are following the trends and ideologies of man, not the word of God.

      Reply
    • Rocket Rasta

      @Isa,
      You made some comments, but provided no proof.
      Good debating decorum states that if you make a claim, you need to back it up with facts.
      Please cite your sources for the following:
      “One such article discussed a small, mostly unknown fragment of early church history: that Joseph Smith had revelation concerning the ordainment of women.”

      Reply
      • Ann

        Yes, exactly. You can’t claim something like that, & then say, “Now go find it.” We didn’t bring it up.

  41. Aaron

    You’re quite ignorant on woman’s rights issues.

    This particulatur movement aside, (and I understand your point of view) you are incredibly blind to woman’s rights in other branches of society

    “When it comes to women in the workplace, even in managerial and leadership positions–I’m on the front lines. ”
    Teaching, blogging and writing aren’t really considered male-dominated careers; in which your personal experience for female empornent isn’t conductive to speaking out for all woman-kind that females in society have equal presence in the work force. Not to be a Debbie-downer because I am in full support of you and every other successful woman in thier chosen field, but claiming to be a woman on the front line in a female dominated work force is a counter active argument.

    “When it comes to women voting, and having a say in every single part of government–I’m on the front lines.”

    Women are vastly under represented in the government. The majority of law makers, bill passers and congress people are MEN. And these majority men are taking away woman’s reproductive rights. I’m not here to argue abortion rights on a pro-religious blog because let’s face it, no one wants to open that can of worms. But I want to talk about the majority-men in government trying to force mandatory ultrasounds, mandatory medical procedures to your womb and baby, closing down medical centers that used to carter to woman’s choices , passing bills restricting the availability to birth control, getting inside your doctor appointments, while government officials do things like publicly blame rape victims.. how can they do all these things and still make you confident that your government is representing you equally/respectfully as a woman?

    ” When it comes to women being treated with respect and dignity”

    Tell that to rape culture and 1/3 women who are sexually molested and never get legal justice for it. Have you seen pop culture? *Ahem* Miley Cyrus at the awards show? Robin thicke’s pop song supporting rape culture? Tom Hardey’s photography using women has objects to sell stuff? Have you ever googled American Appareal?? I’m all for liberating women and being sexy and confident in the industry. These few (insanely) popular examples of women in the media go way beyond the fence of sexual liberation / sexual objectification and the kicker is they are WIDLY popular. Its not about less air time for men, it’s not about making women wear more clothes in movies or adverts , it’s not about forcing opposite gender roles on individuals; it’s about accepting women are vastly misrepresented as intelligent, human beings capable of doing more then cleaning or being sexy in the media as a whole.

    “and equal opportunity to reach dreams and goals–I’m right there on the front lines.”

    Congratulations, but your personal success doesn’t speak for the millions of women (and children of both genders) who go without education, health care, legal representation, and justice for domestic and sexual abuse. All these “I am a girl” and “feed the children” campaigns are a direct result of m-i-l-l-i-o-n-s of people (mostly girls although feminism is about making sure under privileged males too) who do NOT have equal opportunities.

    Again. I understand your personal opinion in trying to hold a sacred religious right to remain to be given only to men. Kudos.

    But the rest of your blog… It totally undermines the feminist movement as a whole and flat out ignores the very real issues women (and many men – bless them!) are facing even in our developed society today.

    Reply
    • Sarah

      I am going to open that can of worms because, unfortunately for you, I have science on my side. Abortion is murder plain and simple. By definition, you and I are different on the most basic level by our DNA. The building blocks of who we are. Every individual has a distinctly different set, even a fetus. That’s how babies are ‘made’. Our government and every other entity that I know of uses this information to identify individuals. The abortion issue is a lazy way of trying to not take responsibility for the actions of you and another person. Rape is a different ball-game, so don’t use that as an excuse. Only 5% of abortions are due to medical necessity and rape. Just so you know, feminism is about equality, not being better than anyone else. I don’t recall the author ever saying she was speaking for the feminist movement or all women. I gathered she was just stating her opinion. The fact is, this is a religion, and you and she and these OW people aren’t the head of it, so you and she and the OW people don’t get a say. Full stop. By the way, it helps to be able to speak authoritatively on women’s (sp) issues if you are a woman.

      Reply
    • Rose R. Retalik

      @Aaron,
      “My white skin disgusts me. My passport disgusts me. They are the marks of an insufferable privilege bought at the price of others’ agony. If I could peel myself inside out I would be glad. If I could become part of the oppressed I would be free.”
      –Robin Morgan, Radical Feminist, American Women’s Movement.

      The irony is, if this woman, or any woman, wants to be empowered, wants to be a real Feminist… THEY WOULDN’T COMPLAIN about how they can’t do something, they would design a plan on how to accomplish something. Yet, here is Robin Morgan, a Feminist, lamenting how she CAN’T become part of what she views as “freedom”…
      How is she a feminist?

      People have very different ideas of what it means to be empowered and what it means to be a feminist.

      Thing is, EVERYONE has equal opportunity. K-12 education is FREE. If you go and you apply yourself, you can even get FREE or “Mostly Free” higher education with Scholarships, Grants, and Sponsorships.
      With hard work, women can work their way up, just like any other person, in any business.

      Now, if they choose to have a family… ah, a CHOICE… then they must deal with the consequences of that choice.
      Do they continue on in their career? Or do they raise up the next generation of empowered women?
      Is one choice better than the other? That is ALSO a Choice.

      The problem with Today’s Feminists, and yes, this means OW and AWM… is that they don’t want to work for it. They blame and complain. They want it handed to them.
      Is there some inequality? Yes. Is there a fix for that? Yes.
      Is that inequality as bad as they would have you believe? No.
      Take the supposed “wage gap”:
      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/christina-hoff-sommers/wage-gap_b_2073804.html

      If the cause is Just and Right… there is no need to lie, embellish, fib, distort, exaggerate, or use any type of deceptive tactic.

      Reply
  42. Julie

    So well put! I agree with your religious and non religious points. Thank you for standing up and sharing your views!

    Reply

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